Internet Safety

Your Invoice: ID31WX175T

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MicroPro-Computers-Phishing-example-itunes-invoice

So, you’ve received a strange invoice from iTunes charging you for “Space Cube”. And it’s a hefty 38.59 GBP as well.

What’s this, you think? If you have kids, you might already be looking suspiciously into their direction. However, this is nothing more than a scam created to get your Credit Card details.

How does this work? A fake company sets up a fake email address, picks up a reliable source or a brand (in this example it’s iTunes) and send you a bogus invoice. Certainly, you’d like to find out why you’re charged this strange amount, and there’s a helpful link at the bottom of the email for you to do just that. But that link takes you to a completely different page to what you have anticipated and reads and records your card details for the scammers to use instead.

To cut the story very short: do not trust every email you get. A strange invoice from the iOS App Store is easy to check:

1. Log into your iPhone (iPad)

2. Got to the App Store

3. Tap on “Purchased” & view all.

Don’t see that strange game on your purchased app list? Nothing to worry about.

Have other scam examples to share with us? Not sure if the email you have received is safe? Let us know.

Change the password for your Ebay account

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Ebay is urging all of its users to change passwords following heavy cyber attack earlier this month.

According to the PayPal release earlier this afternoon, you don’t have to change your PayPal information and your card records are secure.

If you’re selling or buying any items on Ebay, change your password right away. To ensure that your password is as safe and secure read our previous post about your password security.

Stay safe online: CryptoLocker

Posted by | Internet Safety, Practical Tips | No Comments

Have this thing just popped on your screen?

Please note: this is a virus and it can not be trusted. We have a lot of customers coming in with their computers right now complaining about this CryptoLocker thing.

CryptoLocker is a type of malware – it’s a little bugger of a malicious software that you can get by opening a wrong e-mail (for example).

First off, if you ever get an e-mail from services like your phone company, bank and so on – don’t open them. Your official services never contact you over e-mail. They send letters.

Second, never trust anything that is asking you for money out of a sudden in a pop-up. When in doubt – just give us a call on 01 493051.

OK, so you got the CryptoLocker thing on your screen anyway. How to deal with this? Here are a couple of steps:

Download the following tools first then disconnect machine from network

1. To remove the cryptolocker virus run the Sophos removal tool
It can be downloaded from below:

http://www.sophos.com/en-us/products/free-tools/virus-removal-tool.aspx

2. After removal tool has completed download the CryptoPrevent installer tool

Install and then click block:

http://www.foolishit.com/vb6-projects/cryptoprevent/

If you don’t know how to proceed with the above, switch off your computer and bring it to us, or just give us a call first. We’ll be able to sort you out.

Please stay safe and only open e-mails that you are waiting for and know that you can trust.

Don’t have AntiVirus on your computer? Install AVG Free http://free.avg.com/eu-en/homepage

We also recommend Malwarebytes to protect you against malware: http://www.malwarebytes.org/

Questions? Comments? Get in touch. leave a comment below.

Alex

@MicroPro Computers

Exactly how secure is your password?

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Any of them. Have you ever thought of any of your passwords? Are you using the same password for all websites and services?

I’m here once again to talk to you about the security of your information. I’ve already told you a story about the importance of backing up (http://on.fb.me/1f0sHoa). Well, this time I have even better example.

Gizmodo has a published a list of the most popular passwords for 2013 (http://bit.ly/Lvsf6l), based on the “millions of public passwords stolen through the year”. You can get a better insight of where these passwords came from from the link above, and here’s the list from the site:

1. 123456 (Up 1)
2. password (Down 1)
3. 12345678 (Unchanged)
4. qwerty (Up 1)
5. abc123 (Down 1)
6. 123456789 (New)
7. 111111 (Up 2)
8. 1234567 (Up 5)
9. iloveyou (Up 2)
10. adobe123 (New)
11. 123123 (Up 5)
12. Admin (New)
13. 1234567890 (New)
14. letmein (Down 7)
15. photoshop (New)
16. 1234 (New)
17. monkey (Down 11)
18. shadow (Unchanged)
19. sunshine (Down 5)
20. 12345 (New)
21. password1 (Up 4)
22. princess (New)
23. azerty (New)
24. trustno1 (Down 12)
25. 000000 (New)

Is one of your passwords in the list? Perhaps, it’s time to change something. Here are a few good tips on how to choose a more secure password.

1. Choose a combination of letters and numbers – it’s a mantra that every website sticks to these days, you will find this sentence under every password window when you register for one thing or another. So follow it. However, remember to also choose small & capital letters in the password to make it more secure.

2. Use a special character – some websites might not allow you to use special characters in the password, like a “£” or a “&” sign. But sure enough any website will allow you to use “!”. Yes – an exclamation mark! Be happy about your new password – an exclamation mark in your password is an excellent way to add an extra layer of security to it.

3. Use a different password for each website – it might be hard to remember all places you have registered on, but the chances are – if one of your account sis hacked on one of the websites is extremely easy to get all the rest of your profile information everywhere else. So, stay safe. Especially, when choosing a password for the likes of Ebay, PayPal, Amazon, your bank etc.

4. Choose a word that is not associated with the software you’re registering for – or the website. Say you’re choosing your WiFi password. Don’t make it “Broadband123!”. Even in this format it’s easy to hack.

5. Check how fast it would take to hack your password – here’s a link to the website to check how easy it is to hack your password http://howsecureismypassword.net/. You might be surprised.

Do not ever share your password with anyone. If you absolutely need to share you password in some circumstance or the other, and you have to do it over the email – send a picture of it rather than a text format one. Never give you password to anyone over Facebook.

Do you have a good advise on how to choose a good password? And how do you remember passwords for all the websites you have registered for?

Regards

Alex

@MicroPro Computers